The Decks to Expect – Part 3

All good things come in threes! In this third and final installment of my little article series (Part 1 and Part 2), we’ll take a closer look at the remaining 2 Decks we expect to see quite a lot this weekend and also give quite a few honorable mentions to other archetypes that might still pop up among the top tables.

[h2]Madolche[/h2]

Some players claimed the Madolche Deck already had all the tools it needed to win larger tournaments like a YCS or a National Championship prior to the release of [prio]. While it’s possible to argue with hundreds of Duelists, it’s a lot harder to make a case against solid numbers; before [prio] was released, we saw next to no Madolche Decks in the knock out portion of the larger tournaments.

All that changed with PRIO, mostly because of this one card:
[nbsp]
Anjelly was the missing piece in the puzzle that was the Madolche Deck!
[nbsp]
So let’s get this straight: The defining quality of the Madolche Deck is that it tends to keep its Graveyard rather empty – whenever a Madolche Monster is getting destroyed, it returns to your Deck rather than ending up in your Graveyard. Still, a monster that freely Tributes itself (and as a result ends up in your Graveyard) is the key to unlocking the full potential of the monster family?
Well, add [mad hoot] and you can easily [ss] 2 monsters in one turn, because it just so happens to require a monster in your Graveyard. This will then often result in [mad tiara], the boss monster of the Deck that can easily turn games around all by itself. And that’s not an understatement; being able to get rid of 2 opposing cards without actually destroying them is a very huge deal. And the fact that the effect doesn’t target makes it even harder for your opponent to dodge the bullet and be left with something that at least resembles a field.
[nbsp]

Tiaramisu went on a rampage tour in this Duel!

Tiaramisu went on a rampage tour in this Duel!

[nbsp]
There are other support cards worth mentioning: [chateau] and [mad ticket]. If your opponent can’t get rid of them right away, there is just no way for him to win the war of card advantage. Both of them allow you to return “Madolche” monsters to your hand rather than returning them to your Deck. Obviously, this makes quite the difference as your opponent will never run out of monsters that he can throw in your way.

[h2]Mermail[/h2]

As you probably saw in our article Deck Choices of the National Champions – Part 1, some of them were once again settling on the Mermail Deck. Often, their reasoning went something along the lines of “I didn’t have a lot of time to test and I’m very familiar with the Deck.”
At other times, they deliberately made the choice despite having enough time to prepare for the event.
[nbsp]

Umut Serin won the Turkish National Championship in this way!

Umut Serin won the Turkish National Championship in this way!

[nbsp]
It’s hard to tell how competitive the Mermail Deck still is. Everyone seemed to agree that it has a very hard time going up against the HAT archetype. Despite the explosiveness of the Mermails, the HAT Deck can maintain a strong field presence and once we’re getting to the grinding stage of a game, the HAT Deck will often pull ahead.

Regardless of the chances the Mermail archetype will have, here is a brief explanation of how it works: You combine a number of monsters that allow you to discard cards from your hand (the Mermail part of the Deck) with a bunch of monsters that want you to discard them from your hand to the Graveyard (the Atlanteans) to activate their effects and you will end up with a powerful toolbox that packs quite the punch. Add cards like [megalo] and [a teus] that can be Special Summoned to the field (once again by discarding monsters) where they can then be used as either Tribute fodder or dish out damage and you’ll have enough flexibility to overcome many a opponent.

[h2]The Rest of the Field[/h2]

There are plenty of other Decks that are perfectly viable choices, it’s just that most players agree that the popular Decks are a little more reliable than them. Most better players are somewhat risk averse and that’s why they instead prefer to rely on the “big 5”.
We do expect to see a few versions of the Chaos Dragon archetype, the Evilswarm Deck proves popular with players that want to run an Anti strategy, but not necessarily play Bujin, and then there’s also Lightsworn, a Deck that certainly needs no introduction.

Thanks to the brand new additions to the archetype from the [sdli], they are back and better than ever. Rather than highlighting their respective strenghts and weaknesses here, we will later sit down with a Lightsworn player and take his Deck profile. I hope this overview helped you making a little more sense of the current metagame and I hope you’re looking forward to our Deck Analysis.
[nbsp]

Back to all news

Latest Articles

2022 | German National

Standings Runde 5

Read More

2022 | German National

Standings Runde 4

Read More